Anger as Facebook passes on teen’s secret messages as his mother is arrested

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Facebook is under fire after it passed the private messages of an American teenager to the police, leading to her mother being charged over the girl’s “illegal” abortion.

At a time when the layoff issue has opened a politically charged chasm across America, women are being urged to delete Facebook over privacy fears.

Meta, the social media site’s parent company, said it complied with a police warrant when it passed dozens of messages between Nebraska mother Jessica Burgess and her 17-year-old daughter , Celeste.

The couple were being investigated over what was believed to be a stillborn burial, with Celeste claiming she gave birth in the shower before placing the fetus in a box, burning it and burying it. ‘bury.

She was 23 weeks pregnant at the time, in a condition that only allows pregnancy terminations up to 20 weeks.

The mother and daughter were charged in April with concealing or abandoning a corpse and two less serious crimes.

But last month, when Facebook conversations were scrutinized by detectives, Ms Burgess, 41, was also charged with illegally obtaining and giving abortion pills to her daughter.

Facebook is under fire after it gave the private messages of an American teenager to the police, leading to her mother being charged over the girl’s ‘illegal’ abortion

The couple had discussed on Facebook’s Messenger feature how Celeste could use drugs to induce an abortion and how they could dispose of the fetus.

The teenager reportedly said she was eager to remove the ‘thing’ from her body before a ‘friend’ informed police that she had seen Celeste take the first abortion pill, allegedly bought by her mother.

Both women denied the charges when appearing in court last week. Now 18, Celeste is judged as an adult.

Court documents show that Facebook passed the conversations on to Nebraska police after receiving a warrant.

This comes nearly two months after a Supreme Court decision to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade case, stripping millions of American women of their constitutional right to abortion.

Pro-choice and privacy activists previously warned that tech giants would be forced to release information if more states introduced stricter abortion laws.

Meta, the parent company of the social media site, said it complied with a police warrant when it passed dozens of messages between Nebraska mother Jessica Burgess (right) and her daughter 17 years old, Celeste.

Meta, the parent company of the social media site, said it complied with a police warrant when it passed dozens of messages between Nebraska mother Jessica Burgess (right) and her daughter 17 years old, Celeste.

Facebook users have been urged to permanently delete their accounts as the #DeleteFacebook slogan gains traction online.

International rights organization the Global Justice Center said: “Abortion rights supporters have long warned of the destructive power of mass surveillance at the hands of the anti-abortion movement. Now we see what that might look like.

Meta – whose global affairs chairman is former Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg – hit back, saying its policy was to comply with government requests when “the law requires us to do so”.

“Nothing in the valid warrants we received from local law enforcement in early June, prior to the Supreme Court ruling, mentioned abortion,” he said.

“The warrants were for charges related to a criminal investigation and court documents indicate that police at the time were investigating the case of a stillborn baby who had been burned and buried.

This comes nearly two months after a Supreme Court decision to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade case, stripping millions of American women of their constitutional right to abortion.

This comes nearly two months after a Supreme Court decision to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade case, stripping millions of American women of their constitutional right to abortion.

“Both of these warrants originally came with confidentiality orders, which prevented us from sharing information about them.” Orders have now been lifted.

Jake Laperruque of the Center for Democracy and Technology, a privacy rights group, said social media giants will come under more pressure as more states prosecute crimes related to abortion. “It will continue to happen,” he added.

“If companies don’t want to end up repeatedly transmitting data for abortion surveys, they need to rethink their practices around data collection, storage and encryption.”

WhatsApp, also owned by Meta, has end-to-end encryption, which means the company cannot access it.

But the Facebook platform doesn’t offer this level of privacy by default, meaning most messages are stored on its servers.

…but Molly’s parents were denied access

Daily mail reporter

The Nevada abortion case is not the first time Meta has come under fire for responding to data requests.

The parents of London schoolgirl Molly Russell have pleaded with the social media giant to give them access to private accounts as part of the investigation into the teenager’s death.

The 14-year-old took her own life in November 2017 after seeing graphic images of self-harm and suicide on the Meta-owned photo and video sharing platform Instagram.

A coroner had to order the California company to release the data in February after denying the family’s request. Meta said it provided 12,000 pieces of content to the court a month later, with its lawyers saying they were working at “full speed”.

The parents of London schoolgirl Molly Russell (pictured) have pleaded with the social media giant to give them access to private accounts as part of the investigation into the teenager's death.

The parents of London schoolgirl Molly Russell (pictured) have pleaded with the social media giant to give them access to private accounts as part of the investigation into the teenager’s death.

The company had previously claimed that it did not hold data on the algorithms and type of content promoted on Molly’s account before her death. Molly’s father, Ian Russell, said he wanted to review all of the content she interacted with before giving her witness statement to the inquest.

Family lawyers accuse Meta of unnecessary delays and the inquest has been adjourned until next month.

And Molly’s parents aren’t the only ones who have taken the company to task in an effort to get answers about their child’s death. In July 2018, a German court ordered Facebook to turn over a girl’s account to her parents so they could determine if her death was a suicide.

The 15-year-old was hit by a train in 2012, but the company has denied the couple’s repeated requests to access their daughter’s profile and search for clues as to how she died, citing security concerns. privacy.

Brazilian authorities went further in 2016 when Facebook did not hand over the data. Police have arrested Facebook’s Vice President for Latin America after the social media giant denied access to information in a drug and organized crime investigation.

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